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Book Memories #2: Ruminations on Train Travels

The second in a (very) occasional series about experiences that comes to mind about my reading past.  I honestly thought I had done more entries than this but a quick look at the 205 drafts saved, reveals a bunch of rotting posts in waiting, that need to be rewritten.

Dashing off these notes in that zone of midday when the intersection – of which we reside on one of the corners – is devoid of people and noise thanks to the heat.  Only the whir of the heroic electric fan and the clicking of Rambo’s claws on tile as he wanders around intrude upon my silence.

As I read (the perfect pastime to aid digestion of the midday meal, and it’s not considered a meal unless it is with rice) my latest fiction book, The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver, one of those random thoughts arrived at the station of consciousness.  It was a memory of a train journey that I didn’t take.  Although the memory is hazy, I am certain it was a train journey taken by Michael Palin in one of his travel books, probably Sahara or Himalaya.

Judging by the two narrowed down titles, I am certain I would have read both in Summer, thanks to my ‘method reading’ and the reasoning that unless it is a book from a so-called cold country then Summer is undoubtedly the season to embark on book travel, as well as real.  It wasn’t the actual journey that was the focus of my thoughts though, rather the accompanying feeling to reading the words.  It’s that sense of the intrepid, a unique kind that is available only to the armchair traveller, accompanying through the words but layering it with one’s own imagination and experiences.  It’s an exhilarating call to the upcoming adventure and the unpredictability that inspires and excites creativity.

Unlike actual travelling which is on the whole less romantic, where the sense of the uncharted is undermined by all the research and planning, it is rather the sense of open-ended wonder of the unfamiliar that is placed in a comfortable framework of certainty.  This reading experience is by no means a common thing, rather it follows the reader around and creeps up from time to time, a welcome companion who greets me every so often, signalling a new part of a expedition, promising new perspectives and rituals to discover.

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Posted by on 13/07/2018 in Book Memories, My Writings

 

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Fire in the Blood – Irène Némirovsky

Set in the rural French town in Burgundy that would also form the backdrop to the bestselling Suite Française, Fire in the Blood is the story of Silvio, his cousin’s wife Hélène, her second husband Françoise, and of the truths, deaths, marriages, children, houses and mills that bind them with love and hatred, deception and betrayal.

This novel is an absolute rural treat from one of my favourite 20th century authors, tragically lost to us at Auschwitz.  The story is a wonderful showing of her talent for unflinchingly portraying the passions and flaws of her characters. Her brutally honest observances of the human nature (in all of her books) make for some wonderfully memorable protagonists, and although this book was unfinished at the time of her death, it still retains its power to captivate the reader.

The story opens with an intimate family setting, a real country way of life, very family orientated and in this instance in touch with nature, its beauty and the integral part it plays in their community. The opening’s vibrant scene setting is both rich in detail and in building characterisation and is a great foundation for the forthcoming drama.  None of which I will comment on as at 152 pages, I run the risk of spoiling too much of the plot.

The layering of intricacies in this small close-knit town and the beautifully drawn characters is slowly teased out over the course of the story, allowing us to change allegiance to people as we understand them in greater depth. It’s a claustrophobic, rule laden arena, made all the more obvious by Silvio, who has travelled the globe, lived a varied life, and cares little for the social nuances he has returned to.

In nature, there is a moment of perfection when every hope is realised, when the luscious fruits finally fall, a crowning moment towards the end of summer.  But it quickly passes and the autumn rains begin.  It’s the same for people.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 11/07/2018 in Fiction

 

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Bali Days 6 – 8: Ice Cube Tax

Up early today (day 6) at 5:30 in the AM and feeling good after the day before’s events.  A peaceful trip to the beach was in order, where the waves were good, the water warm, and the added bonus of it being to early for all the hawkers. Most of the rest of the day was taken up with watching Crissy and Mamabear bartering outrageously for gifts.  This included borderline shoplifting and claims of Mamabear having murdered people back in The Philippines. It was funny to see the locals being frustrated and meeting their match in these two Filipina bargaining machines. It was also surprising to learn that clearly signed one way streets are made into two-way streets by scooters using the narrow pavements to drive up, naturally this is done against the flow of pedestrians.

A lack of photos from the final couple of days, here’s another photo of the manicured rice terraces.

Such is the desperation for a sale in these shops (still selling the same things seen everywhere else on the island), that when enquiring about the price of a football shirt (I only had time to see a Juventus shirt before being pounced upon), I was given a price and then the shirt was bagged up and thrust into my hands and the owner told me to take it and come back with the money. Not wanting to be accused of shoplifting, the sale was hastily abandoned.

Later on I had a taste of Bintang, the local generic beer which offered no surprises with taste and is interchangeable with many others from around the world. Sitting outside in the coffee bar of the hostel – or for that matter in any place where you wish to relax – means that people selling trinkets or just begging come in and bother you.  The locals don’t seem to think it a problem and ignore it, making it uncomfortable which lost the business their tip in the process.  In one eaterie, I noticed that the menu actually listed the cost of ice cubes, after an extensive check I didn’t find any pending charges for wear and tear of the seats.

The Missus and the pool.

Arriving near the airport in Kuta for our final full day, we were happy to find the Mega Boutique Hotel, namechecked here because it was lovely.  Firstly I found highlights of Hertha Berlin Vs Eintracht Frankfurt and VFB Stuttgart Vs Werder Bremen matches, a rare footballing treat for me, and also a lovely pool.  It was great to just slowly kick my legs looking up as the sky turned from bright blue to black.  The water covered my ears and dulled the bland dance music that blared out, it made everything alright on the last night.  All blog posts should be planned through this process, just exercising, alone with one’s thoughts and only the occasional gentle bump of the head to remind you to change directions. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 09/07/2018 in Bali, Travel

 

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Music to Write By#4 – The Life of Riley

Finding an old bookmark to a playlist of Britpop music, there was plenty of good stuff to choose from this week; Pulp, Suede, Supergrass, Manic Street Preachers, Shed Seven, Blur, Oasis, The La’s, and so on, you get the picture.  Waging war with the karaoke machine down the street, I was blasting these out as any rock/indie lover would, when I was reminded of a jaunty number that would get my mood upbeat (I am writing this on a Monday so need it) and also provide a soundtrack to the football that I don’t have access to, but brings back memories of Goal of the Month on Match of the Day.

Not only will you fancy rifling a shot into the top corner from 30 yards, to cascading cheers from crowded terraces, it also gave me the important reminder that, although the weekend – spent lazily – was over we should always make time for the good stuff as I shall be doing this weekend again.  This song does sound so much better on a Friday (as I confusingly write this bit of the post) with its bouncy nature, when the week seems to be heading downhill in a good way.

Although this song has been accompanying me a lot as I sit at the computer, this has been a lot less than usual because I can once again tease some interesting future news which will be being announced as soon as the paperwork is all done and dusted, before that it must be started though!  Needless to say that it will get me out of the house and will hopefully I will be able to keep up with my already ambitious ideas for said project.  More on that in the next few weeks though.

Next week, I will once again be fighting against the avalanche of posts that I need to write and never seem to get time for.  Until then, happy writing and happy weekend.

 
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Posted by on 06/07/2018 in Music

 

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Things to Remember while Writing a Book Review

Things to Remember while Writing a Book Review

Two reblogs in two days is not the usual for me, but this post has your humble host featured in it so I couldn’t resist.

The Musing Quill

As book-lovers, most of us readers also love to review the books we read. Reviews not only help to record our experience of the book, but also help the reading community in deciding what books to read and why. But that is only as long as a book review is done right.

The first book I reviewed or rather attempted to review was Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. This was five years ago when I did not much know the technicalities. A reader who was a regular book reviewer then, commented saying,

“This isn’t a review.”

After so many years, when I stumbled past my review again, I know why she said so.

As reviewers, we have our own styles and there are certain things that need to remain consistent, as a rule of the thumb. Today, although I am a professional reviewer, there are things I learn every single day and…

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Posted by on 04/07/2018 in Blogging

 

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Welcome Author Irene Olson

A really wonderful post that deserves a share:

Jill Weatherholt

They say people come into your life exactly when you need them. I’m thrilled to introduce you to someone who has been a tremendous support to me and my family, Irene Olson. She and another blogger friend have walked a path that’s now my own to travel. By sharing their personal experiences, they’ve helped me to prepare for the future. I’m also excited to announce that Irene’s book, REQUIEM FOR THE STATUS QUO, is a finalist in the Caregiving category of the 2018 National Indie Excellence Awards. I know she’s thrilled to honor her father in this manner.

Learn as you go caregiving

by Irene Frances Olson www.irenefrancesolson.com

All family caregiving has its seemingly insurmountable challenges. Whether a hands-on provider of care, or the long-distance caregiver managing care from afar, families on the dementia journey rarely enjoy a return to the wonderfully predictable and boring status quo of days…

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Posted by on 03/07/2018 in Fiction, Life

 

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Stop Politicising My Dumplings!

It’s Monday and catching up on the YouTube I follow after a few day’s absence was predictably depressing.  There was a ‘woke’ BBC sketch (this is the BBC that has admitted it would never commission something like Monty Python these days) that has been doing the rounds recently which was mildly amusing – at best – but (and although I don’t always agree with him) this Jonathan Pie tirade really gets the message across in a much more forceful way.

It’s a much-needed rant and I believe he speaks for many sane people on the subject, just with more expletives.  We only get one life, we should concentrate on saving the culture as well as the physical planet.  It would be great to hold all these virtue signallers to account and mock them mercilessly – as nobody has the right not to be offended – but if you notice, more and more websites are disabling or deleting comments that echo Mr Pie’s…funny that.

 
 

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