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Kids

For today’s second reblog, or ‘press this’ as I thought I would attempt one of those instead is a belated call for attention to Resa’s upcoming kid’s month in March.  I myself will be participating and submitting my entry soon.  Whilst you’re at it check out Resa’s stunning art gown created for her post with Aquileana on Artemis as well at https://aquileana.wordpress.com/2017/02/20/%e2%96%bagreek-mythology-artemis-dual-archetype-collaboration-with-resa-mcconaghy-and-mirjana-m-inalman%f0%9f%8c%9b%f0%9f%8f%b9/

Also don’t forget to check out my first reblog, of the day too, great content abounds through WordPress all the time and it is good to spread it.

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Here are some youth friendly street art pieces I’ve taken photos of & saved for Kids’ Month.

There are single shots and  selections of 2 or 3 shots. Perhaps you’ll feel inspired to do a poem or short story.

You can post it on your blog, and I will reblog it, or send me the poem or story & I will post it with your chosen pic as a guest post.

There is a row of stars between the possible posts. Leave a comment to let me know your choice. I’ll reserve the pics, pronto! The name of the artist, if known is above the shot.

Source: Kids

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Posted by on 22/02/2017 in Art, Blogging

 

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February’s doubts

I’m finally back and with plenty of news, like the spam message from a certain rabid news corporation in the US which was (unsurprisingly) shockingly written. For now though , go visit my first of two reblogs for today. First up is Andrea, whose blog deserves a lot of love thanks to its evocative photography and subject matter. A haven for all those wishing to appreciate the simple joys in life.

Harvesting Hecate

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February is the fag end of winter.  Though I love this season, this is the point when I’m ready for spring, for light, for warmth.  This is the point at which the cold and dark tires me and I trudge through the days simply surviving.  When it is no longer as easy to connect with that self I find in the rich, dark dreaming.  I have woken up, but rudely.  February is the alarm that wakes me when I’m not ready to wake, interrupting a peaceful sleep.  It is the truculent moment when I haul myself out of bed before I’m ready, to a day that I’m not looking forward to.  A transition time, but not the lazy transition of summer into autumn, or the barely perceptible change from autumn to winter.  February is hard work.

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This is the time of year when winter can seem harshest.  It is usually our coldest month and the short…

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Posted by on 22/02/2017 in Blogging

 

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Bargain Books

Writing this is akin to those moments when having just finished a book you turn those last few blank pages and have a chance to reflect, I love those pages, purely for that reason alone.  The pristine whiteness that allows you to project an image derived from the last sentence of a book, it is a truly pleasurable moment before closing the cover with an air of finality as all the other books start vying for attention.

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Brattle Book Shop, Boston MA

At the moment I am reading a wonderful book, one I know I am going to highly recommend when finished as it as it deserves plenty of love and to be shared around as an admirable piece of work, in fact it will be my next review.  Considering the content and how it is written made me think of the absolute bargain we readers are taking advantage of.

The cheapness of amassing even a small library of the greatest works of literature is quite obscene really, I go to the local second-hand bookshop and pick up one of the most important books in history for one pound. All the while knowing that whilst the currency will rise and fall in price, these words will be read and reread and new thoughts will be brought forth with each reading.  It really a the most inexpensive pursuit and almost feels like taking advantage of someone, somewhere because it is such a ludicrously beneficial arrangement. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 01/02/2017 in Blogging

 

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New Year’s Approach to a Singalong

Being the New Year, it is probably considered good form to talk about what will be aimed at blogwise for this year.  Whilst it appears a lot of bloggers I follow are not doing big reading challenges but rather smaller genre reads and looking to being more varied in their scope – which is already impressive – I will be staying the same as ever;  following whatever fancy takes me and mixing the books genres as much as I can, hopefully with more of a balance between well-known and obscurer titles.

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Found at Pixabay,com

The main focus will be on more posts this year, somehow ninety-seven is way down on what I was doing three or four years ago.  Having said that the more I read and write, the more there is to read and write, not to complain though having had my best year in terms of views. I know there is better to come from me and more regularly.

On a side note today is my eighth year with WordPress and my sixth with this blog, time flies and I miss some of the bloggers, who haven’t been around, especially the ones I started my WordPress adventure with. To those who remain and all the new ones yet to be discovered, I hope it is a good year for all.  Only one thing can take the mantle of my arch nemesis this year…

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Posted by on 05/01/2017 in Blogging, Music

 

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Their Duty Done: Forest Town and the Great War – Tim Priestley

wp_20161122_001Forest Town in Nottinghamshire would send many of its men to war.  This is the story of those who never returned and whose names are inscribed on the local memorial.

From every city to the smallest of villages around Britain, every traveller will always come across a war memorial dedicated – most often – to those fallen in World War One and World War Two.

All too often one finds themself looking at the names of these people and imagining those times and of the utter devastation of the population and the trauma suffered both at the front and of those waiting back home to hear news; yet waiting in dread as each letter may be an official notification of death.

Their Duty Done, reminds us that each name on the memorial stones and the graveyards spread around the world belonged to real people, with families, jobs and a sense of duty.

Whether you are familiar with my neck of the woods or not, Forest Town and its surrounding area is a typical example of any town you care to pick from, all of which saw many men go to war. FT has the distinction of being a mining town which perhaps aided (for those in that occupation) with the speed of demobilisation and arguably saved many from the early stages of the war, if they chose not to volunteer.

The first half of the book gives a brief overview of each year of the war and chronicles those who died, giving details of their ages, rank and date of death.  There is also a write-up about each soldier, from their birthplace , parent’s names, job, army history and the details of their demise and resting places, where the bodies could be recovered.

It brings home the fact that each person was real, it seems obvious, of course  but with all the literature, films and so on, it is easy to be fixated on the final body count of various battles and the war in total.  In essence we have become desensitised to the human side of war, in the face of the sheer scale of carnage. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 24/11/2016 in History, Life

 

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Poetic Finale

Certain things, I know are lacking on this blog such as children’s books, graphic novels and poetry being the three most obvious so this week I have – hopefully – succeeded in my aim to redress one of these failings.  There is something intriguing about a form that packs so much into so little space, each word has to be weighted and measured for its precise purpose and trying to convey that has been a diverting challenge and learning experience.

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Found at Pixabay.com

Seven posts in seven days has certainly been one heck of a challenge and one that has not only been a lot of fun but also fuelled a love for poetry that I never really knew I had, having more of an eye for the novel in the past.  In choosing (and being chosen by, in one case) writers to feature, I didn’t realise I had amassed such an international flavour of poets until I began gathering my notes and panicking somewhat at my task of adequately capturing each book’s effects on me.

Reading through each one made me think in a different way about what I would write and indeed how I judged each book, with a novel it tends to be a ‘go with the flow and let it all catch up with me somewhere near the end’ job, where I distil it into word chains for the blog but poetry demands each piece is thought upon and understood before moving on.  It was really invigorating and made my squishy brain matter much more malleable for the future.

Poetry makes up some of the best literature out there, The Iliad, The Canterbury Tales, Bhagavad Gita, Through (the looking-glass) to Lewis Carroll, Shakespeare’s Sonnets and the War Poets, and now bloggers there are so much enriching and enduring collections out there that it is often easy to forget how poetry stealthily fill our bookshelves.  Poetry is innate in us and ties tight into our collective histories and cultures and the beauty is tat anybody can have a go themselves or pick up a book and be transported into another mindset.

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Posted by on 14/11/2016 in Poetry

 

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South Bay, Rainy Day

After an overcast start and a forecast saying not much chance of rain, I walked out to the furthest point of Scarborough’s south bay, which was typically was when the deluge struck.  Normally this wouldn’t be a problem but being stuck on the side of a cliff on paths of slaloming sinuously into repeated chicanes, it becomes somewhat more problematic getting anywhere in a hurry.

Curvy

Hot footing it back to the town centre I hid in various bookstores (of which more in another post) before finally exiting out into a bright and sunny day.  It’s great to be here out of season with less crowds and an actual view of where you are going but balancing that is the habit the locals have of crossing my walking line at an angle to get to their destinations, which is no bother as I adjust accordingly…but when their decisive diagonal becomes a gentle arc back across my path and ends up aiming at the side of the street they just came from; well it’s a bit much and plenty of tutting has been bandied about of late, that’ll show ’em!

HarbouringHope

The sea front of this bay is much more commercial with the harbour fair and amusement arcades, accompanied with that cacophonous symphony universal to such places, that doesn’t seem to have changed since I was a child.  Mingling with this is the smell of the sea air, chips and friend onions not to mention candyfloss which is a heady and classic mix of magic to the olfactory senses. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 12/10/2016 in Travel

 

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