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Tag Archives: vacation

A Steady Trip

With plenty of photos of both bays filling my SD card, it was the smaller features that began to fascinate more as time went on.  It was pleasant that I could choose to go from a fun fair and noisy amusements at one end of the south bay to peaceful climbs above and around the Spa Complex, a regular holder of musical events and sometimes featured on the small screen to boot.

Pathé

Out of season holidaying may make the walks satisfyingly peaceful but one thing that is never out of view for long is those treasured bits of cheap colourful plastic that are part of so many memories and pretty much everyone’s first lesson in architecture.

FakePlasticTrees

From looking through the blog comments, I am given to understand that there are a few literature fans amongst you so I snapped this, I walked by the graveyard five times before remembering it was there, typically. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 20/10/2016 in Travel

 

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Booked Out

After redeeming a Waterstones stamp card and claiming back all my amassed points, this book haul was cheap for its size, the entirety of which set me back a paltry £17.98, of which most was spent in second-hand bookshops.

BuckAndBooks

First off was a trip to the charity shops where I found a my first Virago – a publisher beloved by so many on here – and then a second, bookended by yet more recommendations and at the price it would have been silly not to.

FoodForThought

Visiting the wonderfully named Mrs Lofthouse’s Second Hand Book Emporium, I expected great things, but the above collection is sadly all I found, the fiction section in particular was deeply lacking in-depth to my mind.  I wanted to pick up more but there was little else of note and thus came away with quality instead of quantity. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 14/10/2016 in Essays, Fiction, Lists/Ephemera, Travel

 

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South Bay, Rainy Day

After an overcast start and a forecast saying not much chance of rain, I walked out to the furthest point of Scarborough’s south bay, which was typically was when the deluge struck.  Normally this wouldn’t be a problem but being stuck on the side of a cliff on paths of slaloming sinuously into repeated chicanes, it becomes somewhat more problematic getting anywhere in a hurry.

Curvy

Hot footing it back to the town centre I hid in various bookstores (of which more in another post) before finally exiting out into a bright and sunny day.  It’s great to be here out of season with less crowds and an actual view of where you are going but balancing that is the habit the locals have of crossing my walking line at an angle to get to their destinations, which is no bother as I adjust accordingly…but when their decisive diagonal becomes a gentle arc back across my path and ends up aiming at the side of the street they just came from; well it’s a bit much and plenty of tutting has been bandied about of late, that’ll show ’em!

HarbouringHope

The sea front of this bay is much more commercial with the harbour fair and amusement arcades, accompanied with that cacophonous symphony universal to such places, that doesn’t seem to have changed since I was a child.  Mingling with this is the smell of the sea air, chips and friend onions not to mention candyfloss which is a heady and classic mix of magic to the olfactory senses. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 12/10/2016 in Travel

 

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North Bay, Sunny Day

It seems my photo snapping skills have regressed somewhat since the last time I had cause to be snap happy so apologies in advance, it may be time for a better camera that can ‘do’ the long shots better.

TeaTime

This first one is the view from my window, which shouldn’t have been my window but timing my stay for the quiet season meant an unexpected upgrade to a double room still with free breakfast.  There is something melancholy about an empty stadium, I like it.

SittingOnTheTopOfTheBay

Attempting to catch all of the north side in the few remaining house before the sun went down, I high tailed it right around the bay, which was a pleasant walk with just the right amount of breeze.

ChaletTakeAPhoto?A few colourful chalets, ideally I would have liked to get a photo closer up but surfers are still using them and my voyeuristic tendencies aren’t that invasive as of yet. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 10/10/2016 in Travel

 

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Fair Game

The other day this blogger went to the Goose Fair in order to take some photos to link up loosely with the last post on Sunnyside, sadly my efforts were rubbish (they even turned out worse than Tremors 4 did) so I have abandoned the idea, despite copious amount of notes and such, instead have a photo of a prize I won on Hook-a- Duck and my latest read.

Can'tBeatABitOfBully

Now I am off on holiday to Scarborough for the week so owing to time, I won’t be around WordPress much, although I hope to visit today.  I aim to post a few posts and keep up with comments and such though as time permits, so please excuse my absence from your blogs, I will be back soon enough with photos, thoughts and probably accosted by a particularly tenacious seagull, which I shall keep as a pet and call it Stegull.

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Posted by on 08/10/2016 in Blogging, Travel

 

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Books, Baguettes & Bedbugs – Jeremy Mercer

ExcitementFoodInfestations‘Shakespeare and Company’ in Paris is one of the world’s most famous bookshops. The original store opened in 1921 and became known as the haunt of literary greats, such as Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, George Bernard Shaw, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein and James Joyce.

Sadly the shop was forced to close in 1941, but that was not the end of ‘Shakespeare and Company’… In 1951 another bookshop, with a similar free-thinking ethos, opened on the Left Bank and, in 1964, it resurrected the name ‘Shakespeare and Company’ and became the principal meeting place for Beatnik poets, such as Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs, through to Henry Miller and Lawrence Durrell.

Today the tradition continues and writers still find their way to this bizarre establishment, one of them being Jeremy Mercer. With no friends, no job, no money and no prospects, the thrill of escape from his life in Canada soon palls but, by chance, he happens upon the fairytale world of ‘Shakespeare and Co’…

This is my first book review since June 9th, as strange as that sounds so apologies to all if I am a bit rusty at it.

Having just recently come back from being away, it is perhaps somewhat predictable that my thoughts would be on far away (or not in this case) destinations so my first review is of a travel book but in a cunning reversal, it is of a traveller crossing the opposite way over the Atlantic.

Mercer opens the book talking about the type of life he had as a crime reporter and how the job affected him.  By allowing himself to be consumed with his journalistic work, his life choices became somewhat dubious and by choosing to leave that behind, he is able to look at his past mistakes with candour and clarity.

Finding his way to Shakespeare & Company soon enough is one heck of a backdrop for any book, a seeming ideal place for artists to do there work, as legend has it.  It’s a setting that attracts wanderers and the lost and holds plenty of eccentricities down to its primitive toilet and the unconventional owner George, who invites people to stay on a whim.

Drifters and dreamers inhabit the shop, all of whom are characters and few ever seem to get anything creative down on paper.  There is a camaraderie to the communal life, as all are sharing the kindness of strangers and beds in amongst the books.  Life lacks romance for the cash strapped dwellers but that in itself is the allure for the rest of us who aren’t experiencing it.  Looking at the actual day-to-day routine of Mercer’s new friends, it is hard not to feel like they are wasting their time when they have this opportunity to write but the struggle to stave off hunger and bad hygiene is a time-consuming one, as is the need for a bottle of wine or two. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 22/07/2016 in Life, Travel

 

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Plymouth and Narcotics

Saturday found me sat in the park on my own with about 20% worth of battery that I had been saving up )thanks to the charger breaking_ so I could ring my aunty and uncle who live locally.  They ended up taking me out to Plymouth, which was the site of the landing of everyone’s favourite puritan Pilgrims.  Going there now with such ease really makes the efforts and hazards they were forced to endure to get there all the more impressive…and then the real challenges began for them.

SAM_2847After a fine meal of fish and chips – well fries – we had a potter up towards the replica of the Mayflower, which as so often with things of history is built up one’s mind to be a lot bigger than in reality.  Highlights, ‘heroic’ rhetoric aside (below photo) was picking up the worst souvenir fridge magnet that I have ever come across.  It is a rubber rock with 1620 stamped on it.  Taken out of context it makes no sense and looks beleaguered in amongst my mum’s (vastly better) collection of fridge magnets but at least it is memorable.

SAM_2854As I mentioned in a past post, I met a fellow blogger, Morgan who made the trip from Pennsylvania to join two English lads – who sprinkle everything with liberal colloquialisms – for the biggest pieces of Sushi the city had to offer and plenty of language teaching.  Meeting a fellow blogger is always fascinating, it forever changes how you view their writings and you understand their mind more, their physical expressions and interpretations.  I urge everybody to go do it. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on 19/07/2016 in Boston, History, Transport, Travel

 

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