The Other One Hundred

After yesterday’s post, it makes sense to add that the last few pages of The BBC Big Read book listed the books that didn’t make it into the top one hundred.  There are far too many Terry Pratchett and Jacqueline Wilson books for my liking, which underlines the major flaw in the survey.

There are some good quality books that didn’t make it, and plenty of choice for the book pile.  After the forty-three that I had read from the top one hundred, it’s even more dismaying to find that I have only read thirty-six of this offering, although I did start Moby Dick, and The Handmaid’s Tale but didn’t finish them.  I trust your scoring will put me to shame.

  1. Three Men In A Boat, Jerome K. Jerome
  2. Small Gods, Terry Pratchett
  3. The Beach, Alex Garland
  4. Dracula, Bram Stoker
  5. Point Blanc, Anthony Horowitz
  6. The Pickwick Papers, Charles Dickens
  7. Stormbreaker, Anthony Horowitz
  8. The Wasp Factory, Iain Banks
  9. The Day Of The Jackal, Frederick Forsyth
  10. The Illustrated Mum, Jacqueline Wilson
  11. Jude The Obscure, Thomas Hardy
  12. The Secret Diary Of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾, Sue Townsend
  13. The Cruel Sea, Nicholas Monsarrat
  14. Les Misérables, Victor Hugo
  15. The Mayor Of Casterbridge, Thomas Hardy
  16. The Dare Game, Jacqueline Wilson
  17. Bad Girls, Jacqueline Wilson
  18. The Picture Of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde
  19. Shogun, James Clavell
  20. The Day Of The Triffids, John Wyndham
  21. Lola Rose, Jacqueline Wilson
  22. Vanity Fair, William Makepeace Thackeray
  23. The Forsyte Saga, John Galsworthy
  24. House Of Leaves, Mark Z. Danielewski
  25. The Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver
  26. Reaper Man, Terry Pratchett
  27. Angus, Thongs And Full-Frontal Snogging, Louise Rennison
  28. The Hound Of The Baskervilles, Arthur Conan Doyle
  29. Possession, A. S. Byatt
  30. The Master And Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov
  31. The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood
  32. Danny The Champion Of The World, Roald Dahl
  33. East Of Eden, John Steinbeck
  34. George’s Marvellous Medicine, Roald Dahl
  35. Wyrd Sisters, Terry Pratchett
  36. The Color Purple, Alice Walker
  37. Hogfather, Terry Pratchett
  38. The Thirty-Nine Steps, John Buchan
  39. Girls In Tears, Jacqueline Wilson
  40. Sleepovers, Jacqueline Wilson
  41. All Quiet On The Western Front, Erich Maria Remarque
  42. Behind The Scenes At The Museum, Kate Atkinson
  43. High Fidelity, Nick Hornby
  44. It, Stephen King
  45. James And The Giant Peach, Roald Dahl
  46. The Green Mile, Stephen King
  47. Papillon, Henri Charriere
  48. Men At Arms, Terry Pratchett
  49. Master And Commander, Patrick O’Brian
  50. Skeleton Key, Anthony Horowitz
  51. Soul Music, Terry Pratchett
  52. Thief Of Time, Terry Pratchett
  53. The Fifth Elephant, Terry Pratchett
  54. Atonement, Ian McEwan
  55. Secrets, Jacqueline Wilson
  56. The Silver Sword, Ian Serraillier
  57. One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, Ken Kesey
  58. Heart Of Darkness, Joseph Conrad
  59. Kim, Rudyard Kipling
  60. Cross Stitch, Diana Gabaldon
  61. Moby Dick, Herman Melville
  62. River God, Wilbur Smith
  63. Sunset Song, Lewis Grassic Gibbon
  64. The Shipping News, Annie Proulx
  65. The World According To Garp, John Irving
  66. Lorna Doone, R. D. Blackmore
  67. Girls Out Late, Jacqueline Wilson
  68. The Far Pavilions, M. M. Kaye
  69. The Witches, Roald Dahl
  70. Charlotte’s Web, E. B. White
  71. Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
  72. They Used To Play On Grass, Terry Venables and Gordon Williams
  73. The Old Man And The Sea, Ernest Hemingway
  74. The Name Of The Rose, Umberto Eco
  75. Sophie’s World, Jostein Gaarder
  76. Dustbin Baby, Jacqueline Wilson
  77. Fantastic Mr Fox, Roald Dahl
  78. Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
  79. Jonathan Livingstone Seagull, Richard Bach
  80. The Little Prince, Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  81. The Suitcase Kid, Jacqueline Wilson
  82. Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens
  83. The Power Of One, Bryce Courtenay
  84. Silas Marner, George Eliot
  85. American Psycho, Bret Easton Ellis
  86. The Diary Of A Nobody, George and Weedon Grossmith
  87. Trainspotting, Irvine Welsh
  88. Goosebumps, R. L. Stine
  89. Heidi, Johanna Spyri
  90. Sons And Lovers, D. H. LawrenceLife of Lawrence
  91. The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Milan Kundera
  92. Man And Boy, Tony Parsons
  93. The Truth, Terry Pratchett
  94. The War Of The Worlds, H. G. Wells
  95. The Horse Whisperer, Nicholas Evans
  96. A Fine Balance, Rohinton Mistry
  97. Witches Abroad, Terry Pratchett
  98. The Once And Future King, T. H. White
  99. The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Eric Carle
  100. Flowers In The Attic, Virginia Andrews

29 Replies to “The Other One Hundred”

  1. Sadly I can only be certain of 28 (there are others I definitely meant to read but I can honestly state with any certainty that I have). And sadly Pratchett and Dahl have boosted that unimpressive number

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  2. How interesting – only about 20 from this list for me. But plenty of ‘really must read that sometime’ titles – oh my poor TBR list…..

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          1. Haha! I am currently watching Game of Thrones (I know, so far behind everyone, but loving it anyway) so this is perfect timing! 🤣🤺

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            1. I thought the early series were really good, it’s always fun to spot the British faces that pop up as well, some unexpected and unexpectedly brief but enjoyable to see.

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              1. Yep, it was initially really good but I’ve just finished series 5 and it is getting very odd. And yes, all that celeb-spotting is great. I also marvel at the sheer scale and scope of the filming etc. I know that most of it will be CGI but even so, mind-blowing to think of the co-ordination and planning behind putting it all together.

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                1. You wouldn’t get the budget or the team to do that on British shows. I think for me season five was the last best season, I started to have more niggles in the seasons after but there are still good bits, some very good bits.

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                  1. Once I have recovered from the death of Jon Snow, I’ll be cracking on with the rest of it. Glad to hear it will be worth it!

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  3. You’ve got to read “Possession” by A. S. Byatt. What a lovely literature-obsessed book, a scary read, and possibly a literary roman a clef! I keep imagining a more scandalous Robert Browning (he actually was quite faithful), and maybe a Christina Rossetti figure in the two main roles, both altered to be characters in this book, but the resemblances otherwise seem strong. I think you’ll love it.

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    1. I read The Children’s Book by Byatt and did have Possession at one time, it is one that I did mean to read. If I see it again I will certainly get around to it. Anything inspiring more literature love is fine by me.

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  4. I’ve read 24 of these although I don’t remember much about any of them. I do remember thinking that Vanity Fair was the most boring book I’ve ever read! And I’ve never read a single Terry Pratchett…..

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  5. I see quite a few that I have read in your list. Flowers In The Attic, Heidi, Sons And Lovers, Silas Marner, Oliver Twist, The Old Man And The Sea, and some others. But the one standing our for me is Lorna Doone. I got it from my mom’s old box of books years ago and I have loved it ever since. It is classic! 🙂 And so is Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Others like Nabokov’s Lolita has been on my TBR for years 🙂

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    1. I will push Lorna Doone further up the list on your recommendation. I love hearing stories of other people’s favourite books and TBR lists are just graveyards of books we never get atound to but are certain we one day will.

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  6. Quite a variety! I traveled to the library and selected a couple of titles off the first list. Foley’s Pillars of the Earth is s a bit daunting, but I like to immerse myself into one really thick book now and then. Last summer it was a Prayer for Owen Meany. Thanks for this additional source of picks. Yay for The Hungry Caterpillar!

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    1. Pillars is very readable, if I recall correctly I went through it in a week or so. There is a bit of cringeworthy sex at one point that made me laugh, just to prewarn you.

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  7. Hmmm. Mistry’s A Fine Balance was fabulous…..But on reflection of all that’s going on in our country, I’m thinking that this is a very white-centric list, isn’t it? It’s like the canon of academia that leaves out so much rich cultural texture, or tries to provide texture/interpretation through the lens of white culture. And it’s also a reflection of the self-selection involved in this survey, yes?

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    1. Being open to all, and allowing multiple author entries will always lend itself more to bestsellers. Being a favourite book list as opposed to greatest works I’ll give it some leeway. For me the problem with the book world is that Americanah was lauded to the clouds, although I found it mediocre but a writer like Wole Soyinka isn’t as well known. I would like to read more quality works from around the world, but I don’t really bother with the author, I’m in it for the story or subject, if it interests me I will read it.

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      1. Yes, so true. There’s so much fabulous work out there that isn’t circumscribed by U.S. borders. One of my favorite new and used bookstores in SF does a great job of highlighting writers from around the world. They just started allowing patrons in again in small numbers, but I don’t feel comfortable enough just yet to go and browse. So I end up browsing a bit online. It’s not the same, though….And our huge library fundraiser booksale has been cancelled for the fall. That was true nirvana. A quarter of a million books donated to the library from estates and other donors spread out on tables in a giant building at Ft. Mason on the waterfront. It went on for five days. Found many gems there….

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        1. I was at a second hand bookshop the other day and picked up A Fine Balance on your recommendation so looking forward to starting that soon. I enjoy reading up on the Filipino literature and history as well. I think that is a good exercise to explore a country through their books, if the books are easily available of course. I would love to go your library fundraiser booksale, it sounds like paradise!

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    1. It irritates me to see the same author so many times, a cap of two or three books may have encouraged people to think a bit more about their chices perhaps.

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