RSS

Bargain Books

01 Feb

Writing this is akin to those moments when having just finished a book you turn those last few blank pages and have a chance to reflect, I love those pages, purely for that reason alone.  The pristine whiteness that allows you to project an image derived from the last sentence of a book, it is a truly pleasurable moment before closing the cover with an air of finality as all the other books start vying for attention.

SAM_2733

Brattle Book Shop, Boston MA

At the moment I am reading a wonderful book, one I know I am going to highly recommend when finished as it as it deserves plenty of love and to be shared around as an admirable piece of work, in fact it will be my next review.  Considering the content and how it is written made me think of the absolute bargain we readers are taking advantage of.

The cheapness of amassing even a small library of the greatest works of literature is quite obscene really, I go to the local second-hand bookshop and pick up one of the most important books in history for one pound. All the while knowing that whilst the currency will rise and fall in price, these words will be read and reread and new thoughts will be brought forth with each reading.  It really a the most inexpensive pursuit and almost feels like taking advantage of someone, somewhere because it is such a ludicrously beneficial arrangement.

In this age of content bombardment, a lot of it being internet clickbait these days, it is wonderful to escape into another world and whilst I may be down on a lot of areas in general, I am coming to slowly appreciate book buying online.  I still prefer to purchase books from a regular shop but the necessary evil of picking up a book I can’t source anywhere else or supporting my fellow bloggers and writers who self publish has opened up new reading opportunities, which I always feel lucky to be a part of.

This January just gone has been a great one for reading and those reviews will flow into this month as I hope to keep up the pace.  I am enjoying self published as well as the traditionally published books, it’s a real mix and considering I haven’t really even started reviews on the majority of my collection yet either, even after all these years there.

There is plenty more to come but more importantly thank you, for all for your recommendations as well as your comments and likes, even when I have struggled to reciprocate visiting your blogs in as timely a manner as you all do to mine.  It is really appreciated and you keep me going and focused on writing more content and trying to become a better writer who sees and values more in what he reads.

Save

Advertisements
 
43 Comments

Posted by on 01/02/2017 in Blogging

 

Tags: , , ,

43 responses to “Bargain Books

  1. pedrol

    01/02/2017 at 14:02

    You’re doing an amazing job and I totally understand if you don’t have time to review all the books you read and cooment around, it’s not easy to be a blogger… Also, as a book lover, like me, we know the time we invest in our readings! And I feel the same, sometimes I want to review one book or another because I just have finished and I feel so motivated and then the time passes… Hugs! PedroL

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      01/02/2017 at 14:10

      Time passing is a problem, memories of the book fade, notes don’t make as much sense either and it becomes even more of a challenge. I am intent on reviewing everything I have even as mire are sent to me, it is a challenge but an exciting one. Only time challenges us, as readers and bloggers but it helps when comments like yours come in. It helps me along and I appreciate it.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  2. Alastair Savage

    01/02/2017 at 14:23

    It’s often a mistake that they end up with those pages at the end. Books are printed in big sheets, called a signature, which are then folded and cut to make the final product. They can only be cut down into units of 16 page, or sometimes 8 (a half-signature). Thus the page count of a book (the extent) must divide by 8 or 16 at the end. Those extra pages are the left-over bits at the end of the publishing process!

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      01/02/2017 at 14:29

      Bubble burst, I appreciate the science, my romantic way of looking at it will now forever be tainted. It is a sad day…

      Liked by 1 person

       
      • shadowoperator

        01/02/2017 at 14:42

        Dear Ste J, There is nothing to prevent you having your bubble intact and knowing about the science of it too–have you ever thought of making your notes about the book for your post in the last few white pages (either in pen or pencil, as you prefer)? I know that in a sense that may reduce the value of the book if you’re a collector and have to have a pristine copy, but on the other hand, I can’t see you letting go of a book any more than I can see myself doing so, and that way your sense of the importance of the white space at the end stays….

        Like

         
        • Ste J

          01/02/2017 at 14:51

          I like to have a notebook with me for anything that comes to mind, it is a tradition of mine now and I usually note other blog posts off a book as I read so it helps keep all my ideas in one place. I really make an effort to keep my books pristine, for no other reason than they usually cost me a bit and I like to see them as I picked them up at the time. I guess I am really set in my ways, which isn’t a bad thing as I would hate to have to buy an e-reader.

          Like

           
      • Alastair Savage

        01/02/2017 at 14:58

        Oh no, they’re still nice. You sometimes get someone’s pencilled musings hidden away there in a second-hand book.

        Like

         
        • Ste J

          01/02/2017 at 15:00

          The best I get is usually a take away menu which then makes me fancy fast food and that is never good.

          Like

           
  3. Purpleanais

    01/02/2017 at 14:38

    I love this post, this is truly the musings of a bookworm. It can’t be faked at all – I feel your passion and understand it. I wonder, were you always a reader? As soon as you could read?

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      01/02/2017 at 14:46

      I read when I was young but from about 15-18 I gradually stopped until, I left 6th form then I started again as I missed it and now I am this passionate bookworm you read here. I came back with a vengeance you could say and I am glad I did.

      Liked by 1 person

       
      • Purpleanais

        01/02/2017 at 14:51

        Oh, I see. You did have a break from it, I wondered. You did certainly come back with a vengeance. I don’t know many people who are as passionate about reading as I am. I know they’re out there of course but I don’t really have any in my life. I am irresistibly attracted to you because I FEEL you’re a kindred spirit (hope this comment doesn’t scare you lol)

        Like

         
        • Ste J

          01/02/2017 at 14:59

          Not at all, your comments always encourage me to push myself into different and more challenging books, your posts give me the pleasure of intense reading and so I welcome a kindred spirit and plan to egg you on in your writing and reading as well!

          Liked by 1 person

           
          • Purpleanais

            01/02/2017 at 15:07

            We so need to end up in the same pub one day-I envision such stimulating conversation!

            Like

             
            • Ste J

              01/02/2017 at 15:10

              Always up for a drink and a chat, I will make sure I brush up on my French authors before hand as well.

              Liked by 1 person

               
              • Purpleanais

                01/02/2017 at 15:12

                I know you have a never ending reading list (so do I) but may I suggest Marcel Pagnol when it comes to French authors? He’s one of my favourite

                Like

                 
                • Ste J

                  01/02/2017 at 15:17

                  Recommend away, I will seek out some of his work and add it to the wishlist for when I next wander to those dens of vice commonly known as bookshops.

                  Liked by 1 person

                   
  4. Mika

    01/02/2017 at 15:01

    I have never brought a book online haha ive always loved walking into bookshops and i have no idea why. I just do. Haha. I was just wondering what book are you reading right now? I wish i could continue reading now too im jealous of you!!! Haha

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      01/02/2017 at 15:05

      The bookshop is a noble place, it is the promise of a million adventures all under one roof, musty or new smelling books and the joy of touching them, of buying more than you can afford because they may become priceless to you. I would mention the book’s name but I want to generate a bit of drama. It will be my next review though which hopefully will be up at the weekend!

      Liked by 1 person

       
      • Mika

        01/02/2017 at 15:08

        Oh my gosh you make me wonder about it so much! I have 0 chill

        Like

         
  5. Jill Weatherholt

    01/02/2017 at 15:42

    What a fantastic looking bookstore. I think I could live there. 🙂

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      02/02/2017 at 17:05

      I did for a couple of days, the top floor is full of old and rare books, it was wonderful leafing through them for hours on end.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  6. Bumba

    01/02/2017 at 18:00

    Kudos, my friend!

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      02/02/2017 at 17:12

      Cheers pal, I’m quite enjoying myself this year with all the blogging.

      Liked by 1 person

       
      • Bumba

        02/02/2017 at 21:43

        I’m not enjoying myself particularly, but all the same I set up another blog called Moron Writing.

        Like

         
        • Ste J

          09/02/2017 at 12:26

          Do you have a link? If it is on your usual blog I will pick it up there tomorrow.

          Liked by 1 person

           
          • Bumba

            10/02/2017 at 03:15

            I need to do that, don’t I? Will do.

            Like

             
  7. clarepooley33

    01/02/2017 at 22:52

    I love those blank pages at the end of a book too. I have to turn them over slowly and then close the book. Without them a book ends too quickly.

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      02/02/2017 at 17:08

      Yes, precisely! There needs to be a sense of ending, rather than an abrupt full stop, I like to think thiose extra pages are really the other two dots in an ellipsis.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  8. Jeff

    02/02/2017 at 20:14

    If you have some quite old secondhand books, you might consider using the blank pages to make forgeries of old masters. It’s a time-honoured dishonourable craft. So many of the oldest collectables that I catalogued for Oxfam online had their fly-leaves cut out with a straight edge. You’ll need to read Eric Hebborn for details.

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      09/02/2017 at 14:20

      Sounds intriguing, I’ve not come across this before but it bears looking into, Oxfam online needs some special Ste J attention soon methinks.

      Like

       
  9. Resa

    02/02/2017 at 21:25

    What a lovely post, Ste J!
    I love that if you are not posting a review, you are posting about posting one. You are writing about reading books. You are writing about buying books & collecting books.
    Somewhere in between reading,writing, buying & collecting, your passion remains passionate.
    Many hearts to you!
    I have published a page “Kids” on GLaM. I just want you to know, in case you want to reserve a piece of Street Art.
    I’ll publish the post announcing it tomorrow.

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      09/02/2017 at 13:00

      I really can’t get enough, although now it is a struggle to pick a book as I have so many wonderful ones to choose from, it is genuinely sad to put books back because I can only read one at a time. I checked out your page and will email you real soon over my plans. I am excited to be a part of it and have a few ideas already.

      Like

       
  10. macjam47

    04/02/2017 at 20:33

    Though I love my e-reader, there is nothing more satisfying than reading a book in print. Your reviews and other posts are always so well written and engaging. I know how difficult it is to blog, read, and write while living a life. You do a great job, my friend.

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      09/02/2017 at 12:25

      Thank you, my dear readers make it all worthwhile. I’ve worked hard to get the blog up to what it is and I really want to do more with it…if only I could find a way to make it a full time job, I am certain I could add a lot more things into the mix and create something more epic.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  11. writersideup

    06/02/2017 at 01:58

    You’re quite amazing, Ste J 🙂 And I’m curious—who is going to someday inherit your wonderful library? 😀

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      09/02/2017 at 12:19

      Good question! I would be happy for a passionate reader to take it when it is no longer of any use to me. As long as the joy of reading and discovering is kept alive I will be happy.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  12. Liz Dexter

    06/02/2017 at 07:39

    I’m horribly behind on my blog reading, but you know what? I really like getting those comments on old posts that show someone’s been catching up or poking around in the archives. It shows people care enough about my blog to keep paying it attention. Hopefully you’ll feel the same about my comment here!!

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      09/02/2017 at 12:53

      For some reason my Boston posts are the only ones people comment on much these days, ignoring the blatant spam of course…it’s too easy to fall behind on visiting, I have been away for a week or so and seen my inbox get crammed full with posts. I appreciate all your comments my friend and will reply to your email post haste too!

      Liked by 1 person

       
  13. Liz

    09/02/2017 at 08:02

    I like to read every single page of a book – right from the front cover through to the back. It’s all part of the experience. And yes, ‘reading’ those blank pages at the end is often the perfect way to come to terms with the journey the book has taken you on.

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      09/02/2017 at 12:46

      Sometimes I catch myself daydreaming and just sitting looking at them, luckily people just think I am reading a book so it works out. Those beginning and end pages are really very understated.

      Liked by 1 person

       
      • Liz

        09/02/2017 at 19:58

        Like so much in life…..

        Like

         

Tell me stuff...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: