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The Book of Speculation – Erika Swyler

21 Dec

speculativeOne June day, an old book arrives on Simon’s doorstep, sent by an antiquarian bookseller who purchased it on speculation. Fragile and water damaged, the book is a log from the owner of a traveling carnival in the 1700s, who reports strange and magical things, including the drowning death of a circus mermaid. Since then, generations of “mermaids” in Simon’s family have drowned–always on July 24, which is only weeks away.

As his friend Alice looks on with alarm, Simon becomes increasingly worried about his sister. Could there be a curse on Simon’s family? What does it have to do with the book, and can he get to the heart of the mystery in time to save Enola?

Having started American Horror Story: Freak Show at the weekend, I was reminded that I needed to write a review for this book.  One which takes me back to a sunny day on Salem Common where I first delved into it, nothing beats reading in a place with a bit of atmosphere.

Browsing the shelves in Barnes and Noble earlier that week, my eye was caught by the cover featuring a lady handling books, which is the high mark of sexiness in my opinion.  Having browsed the blurb and noted the key features, family curse, carnival and old book, I thought I would speculatively pick it up for review, it was only after leaving the shop that I realised it was coincidentally called The Book of Speculation.

Whilst being a familiar theme, the time-worn, ornate book with obscure secrets to decipher never gets any less enticing or mysterious.  Having an old tome as the centre piece is always going to keep book lovers reading and I enjoyed this one, it built slowly and kept my attention with its fantastical and melancholy elements swirling agreeably into one another.

The book is structured with a dual timeline running in alternate chapters as we are first introduced to Simon, a librarian who’s soon becomes caught up in the history of a carnival, his researches into this travelling oddity unfold alongside his own personal life and the ultimate link between them, his sister. 

We would bury ourselves in books until flesh and paper become one and blood and ink at last ran together.

Both stories had their moments but I find myself leaning towards the old-time aspect of the book, with all its associated settings and underpinning of the fantastical, as well as characters that were fully believable in their setting. The chronicling of the rotting of the family home with all its memories in the modern-day is also worth noting; the theme of water is very affecting physical motif and works well throughout.

This sense of decay is repeated throughout the book and is mirrored in the alternating chapter by the changing of physical place and the coming of an era without travelling shows.  The idea of loss, of the elements taking away what is ours is a strong motif that will no doubt resonate with all of us in one form or another.

It may have been the Buzzfeed book of the year for 2015 but don’t that put you off, although my attention had waned a little by the end of the book it was an enjoyable read, nothing particularly complex about the storyline, just a good popular fiction read, with a healthy dollop of family drama to add to the main plot.  As far as bestsellers go, this one is worth a read, the characters are well-rounded enough to convince and it features books and in this case that is more than enough.

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28 Comments

Posted by on 21/12/2016 in Fiction

 

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28 responses to “The Book of Speculation – Erika Swyler

  1. Mika

    21/12/2016 at 16:00

    Great writing, as always!

    Like

     
  2. Asha Seth

    21/12/2016 at 16:07

    Brilliant review with a most captivating start. You have an ebook of this, J?

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      21/12/2016 at 16:10

      The only ebooks I do is when people send me a review copy of a work. I tend towards the physical as much as possible, it’s more magical to me and workd with well with this books unevenly ut pages and the odd illustrations contained in it.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  3. Purpleanais

    21/12/2016 at 20:32

    I’m sorry but I fixated on this:”my eye was caught by the cover featuring a lady handling books, which is the high mark of sexiness in my opinion.”
    Going by this, I must be one hell of a sexy lady since I’m forever handling books 😉

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    • Ste J

      22/12/2016 at 16:43

      I read the comments you get on your site, I think it seems to be an accepted fact about you already. I am sure that is why there is a history so many suggestive pictures of librarians doing the rounds.

      Liked by 1 person

       
      • Purpleanais

        23/12/2016 at 03:24

        Oh gosh yes, the whole “librarian” thing? It’s been around forever. I love that I’m not the only one who thinks that intelligence is THE sexiest things and that books are sexy. Yay for us (sorry, might be a little drunk right now)

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        • Ste J

          24/12/2016 at 20:27

          We are brilliant like that…people should take note and surprise us with a party or something!

          Like

           
  4. Christy B

    21/12/2016 at 21:46

    A gal holding books is what you consider sexy – we ladies are loving that!

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    • Ste J

      22/12/2016 at 16:37

      Haha, It is the simple pleasures in life for me. Got to show my appreciation for all those lady book handlers.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  5. gargoylebruce

    22/12/2016 at 00:34

    This one’s on my TBR too. Anything titled “The Book of …(insert enticing word/s here)…” Is likely to end up on my TBR.

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    • Ste J

      22/12/2016 at 16:52

      It is pretty much a title to draw readers in, like books about books, they feed on our love of the papery drugs. It does have some YA elements to it as well which will be right up your drainpipe.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  6. shadowoperator

    22/12/2016 at 12:59

    It’s so good to see another post from you after all this time! Happy returns of the season! So, what is a “Buzzfeed book” when it’s at home to people?

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    • Ste J

      22/12/2016 at 16:40

      Buzzfeed is a site full of clickbait and viral videos and little of actual interest, if you haven’t heard of it, you aren’t missing out on anything. Sorry I was away, I am back now and actually feel like I want to write again! Expect more soon!

      Like

       
  7. Andrea Stephenson

    23/12/2016 at 20:06

    This sounds like a really intriguing book – and a librarian main character, I think I’ll have to read this one!

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    • Ste J

      24/12/2016 at 20:30

      It’s refreshing to see the librarians getting the attention, all those books and reference lists that seem hard to get to in a library can be vicariously enjoyed by us now.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  8. Liz Dexter

    24/12/2016 at 07:26

    I hope that’s true of my dear husband, too, as he’s forever seeing me lugging piles of books around!!! Sounds like an interesting read, and one that has completely passed me by!

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      24/12/2016 at 20:28

      It was unheard of for me too, not sure how much coverage it got over here, it seemed to be a big deal in the US. I am sure that is the reason why your husband is watching and not helping you move the books!

      Liked by 1 person

       
  9. Jess

    24/12/2016 at 13:00

    I recently read a story about carnival workers and a family curse as well! Bloodwalker. Though this story sounds a bit less dark :p

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      24/12/2016 at 20:33

      It sounds interesting actually, I like a bit of grim in my books!

      Like

       
  10. Resa

    27/12/2016 at 23:44

    I’m with Christy and Purpleanais. Women handling books is intoxicating.
    Of course, this book review deserves more, and so I say “Cheers”!
    This sounds like a good book.
    Okay, let’s get back to women

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      02/01/2017 at 14:21

      Great minds think alike! Your comment made me grin, more of both I say!

      Liked by 1 person

       
  11. Resa

    29/12/2016 at 21:30

    OMG! 2 days to New Years! Happy New Year!

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      02/01/2017 at 14:14

      A belated Happy New Year my friend!

      Like

       
  12. Sheila

    30/12/2016 at 21:40

    I love the combination of old books and historic carnivals so I’ll have to read this one. Have you read The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern? The old carnival idea made me think of that one.

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    • Ste J

      02/01/2017 at 14:16

      I was going to mention that but then talked myself out of it for some doubtlessly obscure reasoning. There is that sinister feel of something behind the fun facade, it always makes for great reading.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  13. Aquileana

    03/01/2017 at 20:34

    An excellent review and a book I might enjoy…. The plot and the intriguing trigger factor, given by the drowned circus- sirens is certainly catching… (I can feel the echos of AHS´s “Freak show”, for sure)… I also believe that the dual timeline might add depth to the book… 🙂
    Thanks so much for sharing… Wishing you a great 2017 ahead, dear Ste ⭐

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      04/01/2017 at 14:48

      And the same to you my friend, may you teach me much about the Greek myths and in return I will find you some good books to read.

      Liked by 1 person

       

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