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Boston Architecture

08 Jul

The below photo was taken in true tourist style, with head and camera out of window and plenty of waving to bemused locals who had no idea why I would be happy to be stuck in traffic.  Inadvertently the photo captures the wonderful spread of architecture seen throughout the city, the mixture on offer is a fascinating plethora of styles from new, old and ancient worlds.

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Taken in order of when I photographed them, there was quite a spread in the fairly small circle of walking that we did.

It only took a few minutes of walking to discover the John Ruskin inspired Gothic Revival example of architecture shown in Old South Church, completed in 1873.  Admittedly this is not the best shot of its impressive facade but there are plenty more searchable and impressive photos out there.

SAM_2679I was somewhat distracted as diagonally opposite I came across two examples of design stood side by side that epitomise the changes in architecture through the ages in the most jarring of ways…

SAM_2835Named one of the Ten Most Significant Buildings in the United States by the American Institute of architects (and is the only building still retained  from the original 1885 list), Trinity Church was designed by Henry Hobson Richardson and it is the archetype for the style later known as Richardson Romanesque Revival.

SAM_2680Love it or hate it, Modernism dominates so much of our modern cityscape, the John Hancock Tower, just over the road from Trinity Church is the tallest building in New England.  It’s a prime example of the less is more glass and steel architecture that has the beauty of simplicity to it but lacks the pleasing curves and carvings, that so fascinate the eye.

SAM_2735At first glance I assumed this was some sort of grand mosque but is in fact the state house where all manner of exhilarating (probably) politics happens.  To this unpractised eye it appears this is a mixture of Georgian with a hint of Greek styling.  It marks the first building on the Freedom Trail and thankfully is still within reach of a drinks vendor on a sunny day.

SAM_2825Pottering around the Christian Science Plaza later in the week, there was yet another fascinating juxtaposition of styles, above is the First Church of Christ, Scientist.  A sprawling neoclassical edifice complete with water features and people wandering around asking questions about Britain’s history in the Tour de France.  Below is the original church buttressed between the newer edition to the church and its modern brother and sister structures.

SAM_2830Tremont Temple has a pleasing Middle Eastern look and has been used for many things other than religious services.  It was the first venue for Dickens when he toured through 1867-68 tour, reading from two of his novels, A Christmas Carol and The Pickwick Papers which just happen to be two of my favourites.  Built in 1827.  Sam Houston gave a speech against slavery there in 1855 as well, Boston having a strong Abolitionist streak.

SAM_2742The abundance of unique buildings in the area is a joy and there is something for everybody’s taste.  Although modern tastes aren’t my thing, The John Hancock Tower did give my favourite photo of the whole holiday, which I feel sums up how the architecture of Boston fits together side by side so pleasingly.

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42 Comments

Posted by on 08/07/2016 in Architecture, Boston, Travel

 

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42 responses to “Boston Architecture

  1. Jill Weatherholt

    08/07/2016 at 21:51

    Fantastic photos, Ste J! The Trinity Church is stunning. You’re quite the photographer…thanks for sharing.

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    • Ste J

      08/07/2016 at 21:55

      I wish I would have got some closer up but with all the other buildings, I felt the need to catch as many as possible. It was great to see so much in such a small area.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  2. macjam47

    09/07/2016 at 01:34

    These are fabulous photos Steve, but the last one should definitely be entered in a photo contest. It is truly amazing.

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    • Ste J

      09/07/2016 at 19:58

      I think every photographer gets that shot but perhaps I will enter it somewhere, if it helps inspire someone then I am happy. If I can keep up the travelling then maybe I will split the blog with books a little more evenly.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  3. Gitanjali Singh Cherian

    09/07/2016 at 08:14

    I personally prefer old buildings to modern architectural designs, from an aesthetic point of view, but I suppose we have to move with the times, especially when they come with so many improvements, from a practical / functional point of view. Love that last photo of the reflection! Really cool 🙂

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    • Ste J

      09/07/2016 at 19:51

      The newer buildings are less drafty and more earthquake proof and what not. I guess we should be thankful to have such a range of buildings to enjoy. Everybody was taking photos of the reflection, it was almost as big a draw as the market that was going on out of shot.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  4. Sarah

    09/07/2016 at 10:19

    I find that jumbled juxtaposition of architecture so fascinating. I’m sticking up for the modernist architecture though, at least it’s honest. I wonder how many of those traditional buildings, while aesthetically pleasing, are pretending to be a lot older than they are?

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    • Ste J

      09/07/2016 at 19:45

      That’s a good point, there is a lot of faux architecture around but all these are as reported age wise. Modern buildings have the capacity to fit in with the older structures but usually choose to go the opposite way and it can make appearances unseemly which is a shame but preferences are a subjective thing.

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  5. Don Massenzio

    09/07/2016 at 12:47

    Great photos. My wife and I spent a weekend near Beacon Hill last summer and gained a real appreciation for the city.

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    • Ste J

      09/07/2016 at 20:08

      It’s such a comfortable city to wander around in, very good for photographing and the lemonade isn’t half bad either. Beacon Hill was one of the places I didn’t wander through but looking at it through the internet, I think I will need to go back again.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  6. Andrea Stephenson

    09/07/2016 at 23:26

    It does seem fitting that the new glass buildings reflect the old ones as if it’s a reminder not to forget their importance.

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    • Ste J

      10/07/2016 at 14:42

      It’s a fitting juxtaposition and the reflection shows how far we have come in terms of design. The reflection is a permanent reminder of our constant evolution in thought.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  7. shadowoperator

    10/07/2016 at 13:56

    Hi, Ste J! Yes, I was wondering if you were going to get that juxtaposition of Trinity Church and the buildings around it, the more modern ones. It’s really weird to be there and see the church reflected in the reflective glass of the building behind it, totally modern! It’s a famous sight, but you have snapped it from a new angle. And I hate to burst your bubble about the romance of politics, but much the same (if not more so) bullshit politics tend to go on in the State House here in Massachusetts as in any similar political building and body elsewhere. Some good, some bad, some enlightening, and some simply unbelievable. It’s nice to know that our saintly and scholarly Ste J is capable of leaning out a bus window like anyone else!

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    • Ste J

      10/07/2016 at 14:12

      I wanted to end the post on a high note, leading with it would have perhaps have given the impression that all the photos were as fascinating. I’m glad I got a new angle though, there is only so much I can do in my tourist guise, although sometimes I love to get my tourist on and photograph things like drainpipes, just because.

      Politics in all its forms is shocking these days, although there are the odd good ones out there who have not yet succumbed to lining their own pockets. It is ironic that in a country that makes big claims on separating religion and state that it would have a building bearing some resemblance to a mosque.

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  8. Maniparna Sengupta Majumder

    10/07/2016 at 20:34

    Different architectural styles…Boston has so much in store for the tourists. Wonderful captures, Ste… 🙂

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    • Ste J

      12/07/2016 at 11:17

      I do love a good cityscape, I would have loved a massive cathedral but there are plenty of those around for when I have the resources for it.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  9. LuAnn

    10/07/2016 at 22:07

    I much prefer older architecture than modern and I envision beautiful old buildings where you live instead of the steel and glass monstrosities dotting our city landscapes. I love that last photo Ste J…very well done!

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    • Ste J

      12/07/2016 at 11:11

      We have our fair share of this modern architecture but cling on to a lot of beloved buildings. It is sad when local councils seem so willing to tear down old buildings in favour of shiny, usually horrible looking new structures.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  10. aliceatwonderland

    11/07/2016 at 14:47

    I have never been to Boston. Such gorgeous pictures! You should blow some up and hang them, seriously. There is so much we can miss if we just drive by at 80 miles an hour.

    Since you are such a voracious reader too, I figured you might appreciate my post today. I am responding to a “grammar expert” who thinks proper colon usage equals great humor and has decided to educate me. Your grammar is probably better than mine, so you can give an opinion over there if you wish. 🙂

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    • Ste J

      13/07/2016 at 16:13

      Ah you are too kind with your praise. I never thought of hanging any, I may have to do that…it would make cheap Christmas presents if nothing else.

      I shall come over and have a gander in a short while, I look forward to a good rant and a childish snigger because that is the way I roll sometimes.

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  11. Resa

    14/07/2016 at 20:44

    Wow, Boston is really a beautiful city. You took fab shots of what you saw, and you’re wonderful for sharing them! TY, Ste J!

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    • Ste J

      15/07/2016 at 13:58

      I love sharing photos as you know my friend, I hope they inspire thoughts, words and yearnings to travel, all of which are noble pursuits.

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  12. clarepooley33

    16/07/2016 at 23:54

    Great photos Ste especially the reflection one at the end of the post and also the earlier shot of the J Hancock Tower with the sun glinting off it. I usually find I’ve missed the top off a tower with no chance to go back and try for another photo.

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    • Ste J

      17/07/2016 at 09:26

      I have a fear of missing a shot so tend to take a shedload just in case and then looking at that little camera screen, I can’t tell if they are actually any good so then just hope for the best. Trying to fit a building into a photo is always stressful I find.

      Liked by 1 person

       
      • clarepooley33

        17/07/2016 at 09:43

        It is. I have the same problem with small camera screens and my long-sightedness. I point in the general direction and hope for the best.

        Liked by 1 person

         
        • Ste J

          17/07/2016 at 09:44

          You do well with that tactic. The days of camcorders and the like are sadly missed but I do love some retro.

          Liked by 1 person

           
  13. Liz

    19/07/2016 at 08:26

    Another example of how urban areas can be just as beautiful as rural ones.

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    • Ste J

      19/07/2016 at 18:35

      When the effort is made we can have beautiful cities, it is great to see such a plethora of different styles.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  14. writersideup

    13/08/2016 at 16:29

    I am SO thoroughly enjoying these pictures, Ste J, and that last one is a stunner! 😀

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    • Ste J

      14/08/2016 at 14:38

      I saved that one as a treat for the end, got to keep you guys reading somehow, hehe!

      Liked by 1 person

       
  15. jengarynewadventures

    10/11/2016 at 21:11

    I really need to visit Boston again!

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    • Ste J

      11/11/2016 at 19:58

      I keep hanging my nose over the travel sites looking at prices.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  16. archespace

    12/01/2017 at 15:40

    Interesting shots! I live in Boston too, lets hang around and photo hunting 🙂

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    • Ste J

      12/01/2017 at 15:46

      Sadly it was just a holiday from England, visiting your wonderful city but if I am back anytime I will take you up on the offer.

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      • Anonymous

        12/01/2017 at 15:49

        My pleasure 🙂 i hope i can visit England too in the future

        Liked by 1 person

         
        • Ste J

          12/01/2017 at 15:53

          You will be most welcome here!

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  17. psychologyofarchitecture

    08/02/2017 at 14:48

    The identity of such a city becomes so unique when they combine nice old and new buildings. Boston seems to be a nice place to visit 🙂

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    • Ste J

      09/02/2017 at 13:34

      Boston is a lovely contrast, I found Berlin to be a great one for that, it still seems to be fashioning an identity with its mix of architectural styles, fascinating place, a week was not enough to explore it.

      Liked by 1 person

       

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