A Love Affair

Image found at www.fromoldbooks.org which shows a dictionary of thieving slang from 1736
Image found at http://www.fromoldbooks.org which shows a dictionary of thieving slang from 1736

A Love Affair

Lilting, coruscating, amorphous

The simple serendipity of a thesaurus,
The nebulous wonder of infinite word combinations, linked together like the great constellations.

Sultry, dulcet, ebullient

Words. Sometimes a harbinger, at times a denouement but always a panoply of reverence in one’s own demesne.
Whether the susurrus of turned pages or the sonorous language contained within,
The full flow of expression written and imbibed, is mine to cherish and cultivate.

mellifluous, sumptuous, tranquil

A pure rhapsody of ever-changing felicity,
suffuse with redolent comprehension.
The zenith of my love surrounds me always, infused within, now and for tomorrow.

65 Replies to “A Love Affair”

    1. I write good sometimes. Words are great, without them I wouldn’t just have written that, I am glad I can strike a chord with you here but then again that is no surprise as I have read your blog and first book. If we didn’t have language I fear we would all be accompanied by a piano continually in our day to day lives as we fell off ladders, got trapped in lion’s cages, went to the moon and so forth.

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            1. I have been getting lots of Twitter love recently, I need to share some back out, thank you once again. I think my twitter followers number around the 250 mark, so I must do better.

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    1. Haha, I think I probably did, if I had stronger shoulders I would carry around a big dictionary in my bag everywhere I go. Weighing up words is a tough business sometimes but so rewarding.

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        1. I find that as well, the blog reminds me that I need to use the vocabulary I have and to get a better understanding of the nuances of different words, to be as accurate as possible in my writings. It’s great to seek out new words and become better versed in all things language. I have a particular habit of disappearing into etymology websites for ages as well. Lets face it we could waste days in the joys of language if life allowed.

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    1. Thank you very much, I thought a homage to words was something it was high time I did. I spent a while wondering if I should expand it but in the end I decided that less is more which is also my approach to work as well.

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  1. Hi, Ste J. Funny how you love the dictionary and thesaurus. When I was in junior high (known as middle school to some, early teen to mid teen years), a friend of mine and I used to sit near the back of the class in our Civics class (Civics is sort of like government history of the U. S.). The dictionaries and thesauruses were kept on shelves in the back of the room, so we would hurry up and finish our class work and then in the remaining time left, we would write each other erudite and wordy and sometimes plain insulting notes back and forth using words taken from the dictionaries and thesauruses we’d taken from the back shelf. It was great fun, and I’ll always remember that as one of the activities I had the most fun doing. We would also sometimes invent words to throw the other person, words which of course could not be found in our sources. For example, one such word we tossed back and forth a lot was “glannying,” and we had various interpretations for what it meant, some silly and some just rude. That’s probably the reason I still like reading the Urban Dictionary on the Internet sometimes.

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    1. Sounds like an awesome way to pass the time, finding a fun way to learn is always so much preferable from the school work we all had to endure. Your formative years have taught you well. I looked for glannying on the Urban Dictionary in the hope you had defined it, if you wish to it’s there for you to do and would be an interesting read!

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    1. I appreciate you taking the time to stop by as always, I made a conscious effort to really search for the right words with this one, it was a pleasurable task though and reminded me how few words I use in this wonderful language.

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  2. Words are wonderful…and some of the BIG ones are truly…magnificent!!! To love words is the best thing I ever learned from my Moma…after all she’s the one who named our little “gentleman farmer” farm…demesne 🙂

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      1. 🙂 (She and I drove each other crazy…but then we were probably too much alike. She had a definite way with words though and she made me learn to spell.)

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    1. It is amazing how many people that photo appeals to, lol. It was a change from my original idea which is now back in the stupidly big list of post drafts that are floating about all over my computer. I’m glad you liked it, I didn’t write this one in the pub either.

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      1. I was thinking more of Sachs’s introductions on the Good Old Days (which seem to have been somewhat edited out of YouTube clips, alas):

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          1. Aye me too, but without the diseases, poverty, and shysters looming on every street corner with a cosh and a glad-eye fer yer pocket!

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              1. Yeah, pretty scary stuff. I know what you mean though. The setting and acts have an innocent charm. I’m not sure Stewart Lee would fit the bill.

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    1. Thank you! There is something great about flicking through thesaurus’ and dictionaries and finding new words or long forgotten ones, it’s quite liberating.

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      1. Agree! It’s amazing how much time can pass when I start with the thesaurus. One thing leads to another, eternally, apparently.

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  3. This is sumptuous indeed Ste…so much so, I had to read it three times and each time I enjoyed it more. The photo too is marvellous, love it… ‘thieving slang’, ha!

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    1. I spent ages hunting for a photo, I like the novelty of it, perhaps we should make a concerted effort to bring it back into the public consciousness. You give me high praise indeed, I am humbled by your kind words. I like to think of it, on reflextion as a partner poem to Glimpsing Perfection.

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    1. The things hidden in plain sight are normally the most beautiful, language, space and such like..it is sad that many people remain oblivious to the powers of such enchantments. Sometimes all that love just bursts out of me, although not nearly enough perhaps.

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    1. Words are brilliant and all the subtle differences that they bring. Picking the right word can be a joy, almost like a surgical operation in its preciseness. Sharing words is a great gift and I always feel happy to be surrounded by so many wonderful writers.

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      1. You know, I don’t speak other languages (remember blips from when I took Spanish in school a zillion years ago), but as difficult as English can sometimes be with grammar, etc., I’m in love with it. I don’t know if it’s simply bias or if, in fact, it is a language with the most infinite scope with its subtle differences in meanings from word to word to word.

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        1. It’s a good question, I would love to learn some other languages just to compare them and then I would love to read some books in their original language because if the English was stunning, the original source would be amazing!

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