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Dark Fey: The Reviled – Cynthia Morgan

17 Mar

MorganIn the mystical realm of Jyndari, a relationship between two unsuspecting, yet kindred souls who are separated by far more than social stigma, blossoms in secrecy that could shatter both their worlds. Ayla, a Light loving, Guardian of Childfey hides more than a few secrets; secrets that isolate her and set her apart. Secrets that bring her to the attention of one who comes in shadow and silence; one who watches, waiting for the ideal moment to step from the darkness, reveal the truth about himself and alter the course of her life forever.

Book reviews can present a challenge, especially when you know said author, in this case I think a few of you are aware of  Cynthia Morgan’s prolific blog Booknvolume. For those of you who are, you won’t be surprised to find a delicately woven tale of fantasy in this tome.

Being a short read, I was curious at how the tale would set up a wider world in later books, perhaps being more of a prologue to a larger story of depth. At the beginning, I felt that the book was perhaps more geared towards female readers but after the thirty pages I really started to get into the style of writing.

The interplay between the light and shadow worlds is nicely done and the darker aspects do feel more pronounced when opposed with the lucent realisation of the setting, which makes for a more brooding slant on the tale.  The story moves along at a fast pace, placing mystery and set pieces side by side with the Interplay between the main characters combining for a story that even when it dwells feels like it is moving at a good pace. 

The intense relationships of the protagonists come to the fore as the book unfolds and this is its greatest strength, although the odd time I did wonder why characters made certain choices but then again as a reader I always do that because I’m awkward and overly logical, unlike in real life.  The characters have been created to be passionate though and certainly are emotionally led, it helps that these plot threads are finely balanced and well structured.

There is a strong influence of the British Isles, most notably Welsh, in the place descriptions and names, with plenty of beautiful scenery described as Morgan often does.  Overal lthis is a short and sweet redemptive parable which will see book two open up into a bigger adventure with more drama and characters.   Having been picky with my fantasy over the last few years or so, I found myself enjoying this book more than expected and I would be interested to find out what fantasy fans will make of it.

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43 Comments

Posted by on 17/03/2015 in Fantasy

 

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43 responses to “Dark Fey: The Reviled – Cynthia Morgan

  1. macjam47

    17/03/2015 at 22:33

    Great review of a fantastic book. I absolutely loved it.

    Liked by 1 person

     
  2. Morgan

    17/03/2015 at 22:53

    Thank You Ever so Much for such a wonderful review 🙂 I never really noticed the influence of Welsh in the names I’ve used, but now you mention it, I guess I shouldn’t be overly surprised…being a Morgan after all. 🙂 I am delighted you enjoyed and hope your readers will as well.

    Thank You Ste J 🙂

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    • Ste J

      18/03/2015 at 09:02

      I have such a backlog of books to read that I apologise for the gap between reading and reviewing. It is amazing what authors sometimes miss in their own work that reviewers then pick up upon.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  3. Morgan

    17/03/2015 at 23:05

    Reblogged this on Booknvolume and commented:
    My friend Ste J from Book to the Future reviewed Dark Fey recently and this is what he had to say. Thank You Ste J 🙂

    Like

     
  4. Letizia

    18/03/2015 at 00:19

    I’m not a big fantasy buff, but I have to say, that’s a catchy title.

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    • Ste J

      18/03/2015 at 08:58

      I have tended off the genre in recent times as well but the dark title is always one that would pique my interest and it was free so I couldn’t complain!

      Liked by 2 people

       
  5. writersideup

    18/03/2015 at 03:30

    This sounds pretty good, Ste J, but I already know I won’t get past appreciating its cover lol Too much going on here already!

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    • Ste J

      18/03/2015 at 09:04

      That is the beauty of books, they will patiently wait for us, unlike hungry people in a drive thru when somebody wants to pay all in change.

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      • writersideup

        18/03/2015 at 18:32

        Good point 🙂 Yep! I prefer mine on stacked on shelves or in scattered, small piles, too—not waiting locked in an electronic device where I can’t see them all or get to them if said device crashes or the battery dies 🙂

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        • Ste J

          18/03/2015 at 20:09

          That is my biggest fear, being distracted by my battery being low, it would ruin my entire reading session. I have trouble keeoping my phone charged up so I would be rubbish with an e-reader.

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          • writersideup

            18/03/2015 at 21:07

            For me it’s largely that I adore EVERYthing about a book: it’s cover, it’s spine on the shelf, turning paper pages, the softness of reading ink on paper…the whole thing, and of course, being surrounded by them. I do enough reading electronically while on the computer all day. Plus, I think more “apocalyptic” or “storm damage” related when I think of loss of electricity. Your library’s in your e-reader? Your library doesn’t exist. Simple.

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  6. Lyn

    18/03/2015 at 09:29

    Thanks Ste J. Just what I needed…another book to read. Why do I have to love fantasy books (sigh).

    Liked by 1 person

     
    • Ste J

      18/03/2015 at 11:24

      Sorry, I will try and find books you will dislike just to make you happy…kind of.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  7. Sherri

    18/03/2015 at 15:31

    Love the title and the cover and your review has my imagination captured. It’s been a long time since I read fantasy but this one definitely grabs me, especially knowing that it is book one of a series. Thanks for another fab review Ste.

    Like

     
  8. Jilanne Hoffmann

    18/03/2015 at 17:27

    I’m lucky in that I’m not a fan of fantasy. I already have tooooo many books on my TBR pile.

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    • Ste J

      18/03/2015 at 19:17

      Well if you do fancy dabbling, you may find your book pile getting even longer.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  9. shadowoperator

    18/03/2015 at 19:20

    Hi, Ste J. Sounds like a great book. Do you happen to know if the fantasy elements owe anything to or have any relationship with “The Mabinogion”? I really loved that almost the best of the Celtic folklore I’m familiar with.

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    • Ste J

      18/03/2015 at 19:32

      Having only dabbled in The Mabinogion, I didn’t see any similarities, of course this being book one of a proposed trilogy, it will be interesting to see if any nods do come up. I really need to get around to reading that properly.

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      • shadowoperator

        18/03/2015 at 20:09

        I need to re-read “The Mabinogion” myself, it’s been a long time ago. As far as I can recall, I think my favorite character was named Math Mathonwy or something similar. A sort of Merlin-like figure, if I remember correctly (and there’s always the chance that I don’t!).

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        • Ste J

          20/03/2015 at 20:51

          It’s all hazy to me, but I like that it reminds me of a Welsh mist which just makes it that bit more romantic in my myopic eyes.

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          • shadowoperator

            20/03/2015 at 21:15

            Yes, nice mist and all, but I think one of the things that impressed me the most (unless I’ve got it confused with some other mythic book) is what happened to two rapists. I’m not sure after all this time, but I think Math Mathonwy changed them into animals, one male and the other female, year after year different animals with first one and then the other female, for about ten years. Suffice it to say, they got an adequate punishment. That’s what I’ve often noticed about Celtic mythos in general: it’s got quite a lot of things in it to appeal to women as well as men, strong female characters, some sense of justice for all, etc. The tale of how Emain Macha was established in Irish mythology is another such example. Anyway, I’ll be interested to read “Dark Fey” when I get a chance (right now, I’m in much the same state as you, with my TBR list piling up around my ears and time constraints because I’m reading a lot of it on some library websites).

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            • Ste J

              21/03/2015 at 08:47

              Since Dark Fey I have opted to read a mammoth 88 odd page history book which is not the wisest thing to do when the pile is building up but it will go down a bit in one large chunk which is a plus point. Oh, to win the lottery, buy a house, stuff it full of books and sit all day looking at the beautiful view between reading. Bliss.

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              • shadowoperator

                21/03/2015 at 13:31

                You really do read the most varied things. History books are not for me, but I envy you your tastes, because you make me feel narrow and uneducated.

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                • Ste J

                  21/03/2015 at 14:44

                  That feeling is reciprocated by moi if I am being perfectly honest, as I attempt to steal your purse. I do enjoy variation for its own sake, that and I can never pass up on any other book mentioned in texts or just a fascinating blurb. Or in some cases a book that is free.

                  Like

                   
              • writersideup

                21/03/2015 at 15:39

                Ste J, if I can’t have that myself (part of my dream lol), I’ll have to come visit somehow!

                Like

                 
  10. Christy Birmingham

    18/03/2015 at 21:42

    That’s great that you enjoy Morgan’s book more than expected. Always great when that happens! As you say, you’re not sure when it’s a short read. 🙂

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    • Ste J

      20/03/2015 at 20:54

      Short reads need to establish rules and characters and that can be a big challenge when it’s in a small amount of pages, since reading this, I have considered it more than I have done with other shorter books. it’s funny how slow I am.

      Liked by 1 person

       
  11. Elizabeth Melton Parsons

    19/03/2015 at 11:18

    Good morning, Ste J. Very interesting review. I’ve followed her blog for quite a while and Dark Fey is on my wish list at Amazon. When it comes to fantasy, I prefer movies over books, but this one piqued my interest and I’m looking forward to reading it when my Kindle budget opens up a little. 🙂

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      20/03/2015 at 20:49

      I know what you mean about preferring films, I find fantasy can be an acquired taste, a book needs to establish its world’s rules and pull me in, which is surprisingly tough in that genre. I haven’t forgotten about your book I downloaded either, it is ever closer to the top of my list and will be read soon, just got one more epic book to get through before I start.

      Liked by 1 person

       
      • Elizabeth Melton Parsons

        21/03/2015 at 11:26

        Well, none of my books are epic so you’ll have a quick read. 😀 Thank you for taking time to read one of mine. I appreciate it. 🙂

        Like

         
  12. Aquileana

    22/03/2015 at 12:35

    Ste dixit: “I did wonder why characters made certain choices but then again as a reader I always do that because I’m awkward and overly logical, unlike in real life”.~

    Oh! I love that excerpt… It seems like a great book and your review is very well penned and… intriguing as always!… Best regards dear Ste ⭐ Aquileana 😀

    Like

     
    • Ste J

      24/03/2015 at 09:47

      I have plenty more reviews coming my friend and a lot of variety in genres. I’m always happy to intrigue you and long may it continue.

      Liked by 1 person

       

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