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100 Books of Solitude

23 Dec

For those of you that have been following my Quest (it deserved a capital ‘Q’ for its epic nature) to read one hundred book in a year, you may or may not be interested to know that yesterday I finished book 100, Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel.

I started this mad cap adventure last Christmas day and if it hadn’t been for the European Championships (in which we English foolishly persuaded ourselves that as we had no chance of winning, then we must, in fact, be in with a shout because that’s how logic works in films) I would have had at least a couple more books on the board.

100books_Page_0Here’s that list in full:

  1. The Rebel – Albert Camus
  2. Sissinghurst: An Unfinished History – Adam Nicolson
  3. Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
  4. Hadrian VII – Frederick William Rolfe
  5. The Divine Comedy – Dante Alegheri
  6. Aku-Aku – Thor Heyerdahl
  7. The Man Every Woman Wants – Miranda Lee
  8. Night of the Crabs – Guy N. Smith
  9. The Rights of Man – Thomas Paine
  10. Gullivers Travels – Jonathan Swift
  11. God’s Philosophers: How the Medieval World Laid the Foundations For Modern Science – James Hannam
  12. Of Love and Other Demons – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  13. No One Writes to the Colonel –  Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  14. Under The Jaguar Sun – Italo Calvino
  15. Knowledge of Angels – Jill Paton Walsh
  16. The Book of Imaginary Beings – Jorge Luis Borges
  17. Lewis Carroll In Numberland – Robin Wilson
  18. The Dogs and the Wolves – Irene Nemirovsky
  19. Jezebel – Irene Nemirovsky
  20. The Football Men: Up Close with the Giants of the Modern Game – Simon Kuper
  21. Death of a Dustman – M. C Beaton
  22. Down and Out in Paris and London – George Orwell
  23. Danse Macabre – Stephen king
  24. No Smoke, No Fire – Dave Jones
  25. Wasa-Wasa – Harry Macfie & Hans G. Westerlund
  26. Measuring the World – Daniel Kehlmann
  27. Snuff – Terry Pratchett
  28. Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
  29. The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci – Jonathan D. Spence
  30. Wuthering Heights – Emily Brontë
  31. Fahrenheit 451 – Rad Bradbury
  32. In Siberia – Colin Thubron
  33. The Red House Mystery – A. A Milne
  34. The Mystery of Holly Lane – Enid Blyton
  35. The Devil and Sherlock Holmes – David Grann
  36. Mr Bliss – JRR Tolkien
  37. Drinking Arak off An Ayatollah’s Beard – Nicholas Jubber
  38. Berlin –  Antony Beevor
  39. The Wind Through the Keyhole – Stephen King
  40. The Battle for Gullywith – Susan Hill
  41. Have A Little Faith – Mitch Albom
  42. Educating Jack – Jack Sheffield
  43. Mountains of the Mind: A History of a Fascination – Robert Macfarlane
  44. This is not the end of the book; – Umberto Eco
  45. My Quest For the Yeti – Reinhold Messner
  46. The Elephant Vanishes – Haruki Murakami
  47. Allan Quatermain – H. Rider Haggard
  48. My Father and Other Working Class Football Heroes – Gary Imlach
  49. Death of a Celebrity – M. C Beaton
  50. In Arcadia – Ben Okri
  51. The Green Man – Kingsley Amis
  52. Bertrand Russell’s Best – Bertand Russell, edited by Robert E. Egner
  53. The Art of Travel – Alain de Botton
  54. All Our Worldly Goods – Irene Nemirovsky
  55. Elephants Can Remember – Agatha Christie
  56. Jeeve’s in the Offing – P. G Wodehouse
  57. Fifty Shades of Grey – E. L James
  58. The Mystery of Tally-Ho Cottage – Enid Blyton
  59. The Histories – Herodotus
  60. ‘Salem’s Lot – Stephen King
  61. Vita Brevis – Jostein Gaarder
  62. Wonderstruck – Brian Selznick
  63. The Virgin Suicides – Jeffrey Eugenides
  64. The Second World War – Antony Beevor
  65. The Screwtape Letters – C. S. Lewis
  66. Death of a Village – M.C Beaton
  67. The Road – Cormac McCarthy
  68. Strange Pilgrims – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  69. The Story of San Michele – Axel Munthe
  70. The Hundred and One Dalmatians – Dodie Smith
  71. Why England lose and Other Curious Football Phenomena Explained – Simon Kuper & Stefan Szymanski
  72. Frankenstein – Mary Shelley
  73. Red Dragon – Thomas Harris
  74. The news Where You Are – Catherine O’ Flynn
  75. Strange Meeting – Susan Hill
  76. The Greatcoat – Helen Dunmore
  77. Titus Groan – Mervyn Peake
  78. A Brief History of Infinity: The Quest to Think the Unthinkable – Brian Clegg
  79. The Mystery of the Missing Man – Enid Blyton
  80. Crabs’ Moon: Night of the Crabs 2 – Guy N. Smith
  81. David Golder – Irene Némirovsky
  82. Memoirs From the House of the Dead – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  83. Rome and Jerusalem: The Clash of Ancient Civilizations – Mark Goodman
  84. Ur of the Chaldees – Sir Leonard Woolley
  85. TV Cream Toys: Presents You Pestered Your Parents For – Steve Berry
  86. The English Patient – Michael Ondaatje
  87. A Maze of Death – Philip K. Dick
  88. Death of a Poison Pen – M. C Beaton
  89. Up In The Bronx – Stephen Baum
  90. In Evil Hour – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  91. Keep the Aspidistra Flying – George Orwell
  92. The Phantom Tollbooth – Norton Juster
  93. Myths of the Near Future – J. G. Ballard
  94. The Thirty-Nine Steps – John Buchan
  95. Rush: The Autobiography – Ian Rush
  96. Invisible Cities – Italo Calvino
  97. The Painted Veil – W. Somerset Maugham
  98. But Not Yet – Lucy Tasker
  99. Through A Glass, Darkly – Jostein Gaarder
  100. Wolf Hall – Hilary Mantel

There have been many highlights: The Rebel, Aku-Aku, Night of the Crabs, God’s Philosophers, The Second World War (to name but a few),  Lowlights: Fifty Shades of Grey, The Divine Comedy, Wonderstruck, The Greatcoat, and Oddlights: The Virgin Suicides, The book of Imaginary Beings, In Arcadia…

Overall though the purpose and point of what I was trying to do was throw an eclectic mix together to push my understanding of all types of genres and styles of writing.  Not only that but it fuelled my interest in restarting this blog and hopefully keeping you entertained as you travel through the vast spaces that make up blog land.

After such a romp through the literary word and also world, all that remains to be said is that I hope you all have a wonderful and magical Christmas with crackers that do actually go bang and contain terrible jokes that you can then stick into your blog posts throughout the year, I’ll be checking on that last one.  See you on boxing day!

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32 Comments

Posted by on 23/12/2012 in Lists/Ephemera

 

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32 responses to “100 Books of Solitude

  1. boomiebol

    23/12/2012 at 11:45

    Bravo!!! Way to go and well done :). Merry Christmas

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    • StetotheJ

      23/12/2012 at 11:49

      And A very Merry Christmas to you too! I feel like Scrooge on the morning after. I shall plan my next ‘challenge’ in the coming few days.

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  2. letizia

    23/12/2012 at 13:25

    100 books, well done! and what a great, fascinating list. Looking forward to reading many future great reviews and posts on your wonderful blog. Merry Christmas!!

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    • StetotheJ

      23/12/2012 at 13:33

      It was getting tense in this last week with +500 to go but I didn’t want to let anyone down so I just ignored life for a bit (when work permitted). I hope to live up to the high standards of your own blog but with a different colour background.

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      • letizia

        23/12/2012 at 13:43

        That was a lot of reading!

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        • StetotheJ

          23/12/2012 at 13:47

          True, but the social life has been a bit quiet again recently so I took full advantage to sit in bed for hours on end reading about the machinations of the Tudors. I do like a challenge.

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  3. LuAnn

    23/12/2012 at 16:37

    I am truly impressed and appreciate the list. Merry Christmas to you! 🙂

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    • StetotheJ

      26/12/2012 at 19:15

      I hope your day was exceedingly excellent. Glad you like the list, I like to mix it up to keep you interested.

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  4. Tom Gething

    24/12/2012 at 03:10

    Nice going! I’d be interested to know what you thought of David Golder. Nemirovsky is a writer I want to read more of.

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    • StetotheJ

      26/12/2012 at 18:16

      I hope your Christmas was exceedingly good. It was a huge undertaking but I was happy for the experience and also completing it in time.

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    • StetotheJ

      26/12/2012 at 18:21

      David Golder wasn’t my favourite novel of hers but was still very effective. Nemirovsky is extremely underrated in my view. Suite Francais seems to be her masterpiece but i haven’t read that yet, I do recommend Jezabel and Fire in the Blood, but really any of her books is of a good standard, so take your pick.

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      • Tom Gething

        26/12/2012 at 21:25

        Thanks. Yes, do read Suite Francaise. It is well worth it.

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        • StetotheJ

          28/12/2012 at 14:22

          I am tempted to save it until last, but as you are egging me on, I shall add it to my list of things to read in 2013

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  5. Asha Seth

    24/12/2012 at 06:20

    I knew you’d accomplish that. The Reading giant that you are, Ste J! 😀 But then again that’s a great achievement. I had hoped to stretch my reading list to 100 from 80 last year. But couldn’t! 😦
    Anyway, few more to add to my list from yours! 😛 I’ll check the list sooner.

    Happy reading! 🙂

    -Asha

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    • StetotheJ

      26/12/2012 at 18:34

      I think this year you shall achieve it as i will do my best to encourage you. 80 is still a hugely impressive amount. You always pick books i haven’t heard of or thought of picking up so this expands my to read list and that is always a good thing. Between us we shall compile a huge reading list between us!

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      • Asha Seth

        28/12/2012 at 09:42

        Yes, and this year I shall have a separate virtual shelf to hold books from your reading shelf. Cant wait to start reading some of them. And I totally understand the ever-expanding reading lists. 🙂
        And that we’ll do, Between us we shall compile a huge reading list between us! 😛

        -Asha

        P.S.: Still waiting to know your most favorite ones! Hoping that’s not a severe task! 😉

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        • StetotheJ

          28/12/2012 at 14:52

          I shall read Anna Karenina sometime in 2013 then, if you are setting up a whole new bookshelf. Can you put my name on it, that would be great!

          My most favourite books would have to be (in no particularorder because that changes all the time) Catch 22 – Joseph Heller, Voss – Patrick White, Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky and One Hundred years of Solitude – Gabriel Gárcia Márquez. Although tomorrow I could add War and Peace in there or perhaps Love in the Time of Cholera or even All Quiet on the Western Front. I have fickle emotions when it comes to books.

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  6. fantasticbookblog

    24/12/2012 at 06:59

    Congratulations!

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    • StetotheJ

      26/12/2012 at 18:35

      Thank you very much. I don’t think I will be attempting that many again in a hurry for a while.

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  7. Claire 'Word by Word'

    24/12/2012 at 07:20

    And finishing off with Wolf Hall no less! Congratulations, looking forward to hearing how you will be challenging yourself in 2013. Joyeux Noel!

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    • StetotheJ

      26/12/2012 at 18:38

      Wolf Hall is certainly an interesting read, although I did find Mantel’s way of swapping character perspective a bit confusing. I hope you have had a great Christmas. I am currently mulling over new challenges, whilst all the Christmas food attempts to digest.

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  8. readinpleasure

    24/12/2012 at 22:39

    You are amazing. Congratulations and Merry Christmas to you.

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    • StetotheJ

      26/12/2012 at 18:39

      Thank you, it couldn’t have happened without your (and everyone elses) support. I hope your Christmas day was a joyous ocassion.

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  9. 최다해 gongjumonica

    25/12/2012 at 15:12

    Oh dear! Here I thought you haven’t read Fifty! 🙂 I think we finished our challenge on the same day. I reached my 50th on the 23rd, too and it was Paulo Coelho’s By the River. Congratulations in completing your Quest! I am inspired that this coming year I will start mine in January and not June, Haha!

    And oh, good list. I know a few titles and would like to explore others

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    • StetotheJ

      26/12/2012 at 18:42

      50 books in seven months is still an impressive feat, I vote if we remember to have an anniversary celebration on the 23rd each year to show how brilliant we are, because we really are that good. I did read Fifty Shades sadly, I was persuaded (after five pints) that it would be a great idea to read it so i could review it, I didn’t have fun wading through it at all. It did count towards the 100 though so I shouldn’t complain.

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  10. quirkybooks

    27/12/2012 at 22:12

    Thanks for sharing this list, I think my Facebook followers will really appreciate it. I have shared it at http://www.facebook.com/quirkybooksnet

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    • StetotheJ

      28/12/2012 at 14:41

      Thank you very much, I shall aim for an even more eclectic mix of books this year, if maybe a few less, there will be more quality to quantity definitely.

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  11. Liz at Libro

    01/01/2013 at 11:09

    Well done! I can recommend a re-reading challenge as a fun thing to do – once every six months is good. Knowing you just liked my post about that (thank you), we would love to welcome you to join in. Especially as you share a blog design with my main blog!

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    • StetotheJ

      02/01/2013 at 19:28

      I would love to join in, I am all about community. It’s just tearing myself from unread books and their potential wonders is an epic struggle but i shall do my best.

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  12. anna amundsen

    02/11/2013 at 15:26

    But I want to hear what you have to say about ‘Shadow of the Wind’ and ‘This is not the end of the book’.. Why didn’t you wrote about them? 🙂
    Maybe you did and I haven’t seen it, since I’m still deep in your December 2012 archive..

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    • Ste J

      05/11/2013 at 04:31

      I haven’t done either yet, I don’t think…if there isn’t a link then I haven’t as of yet. I aim to review every book I read at some point though so keep reminding me and I will get to them. It’s been ages since I got my teeth into a good book review.

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